APNIC – Two /8s allocated to APNIC from IANA

I don’t think anyone is truly prepared for IP V6 the way we need to be. It will be interesting in the next few months to see what happens. –Justin Two /8s allocated to APNIC from IANA Published on: Tuesday, 1 February 2011 Dear Colleagues The inf…

I don’t think anyone is truly prepared for IP V6 the way we need to be. It will be interesting in the next few months to see what happens. –Justin

Two /8s allocated to APNIC from IANA

Published on: Tuesday, 1 February 2011

Dear Colleagues

The information in this announcement is to enable the Internet community to update network configurations, such as routing filters, where required.

APNIC received the following IPv4 address blocks from IANA in February 2011 and will be making allocations from these ranges in the near future:

  • 39/8
  • 106/8

Reachability and routability testing of the new prefixes will commence soon. The daily report will be published on the RIPE NCC Routing Information Service.

Please be aware, this will be the final allocation made by IANA under the current framework and will trigger the final distribution of five /8 blocks, one to each RIR under the agreed “Global policy for the allocation of the remaining IPv4 address space”.

After these final allocations, each RIR will continue to make allocations according to their own established policies.

APNIC expects normal allocations to continue for a further three to six months. After this time, APNIC will continue to make small allocations from the last /8 block, guided by section 9.10 in “Policies for IPv4 address space management in the Asia Pacific region”. This policy ensures that IPv4 address space is available for IPv6 transition.

It is expected that these allocations will continue for at least another five years.

APNIC reiterates that IPv6 is the only means available for the sustained ongoing growth of the Internet, and urges all Members of the Internet industry to move quickly towards its deployment.

Contact:

Phone:

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